Read Best In Other Rooms, Other Wonders Author Daniyal Mueenuddin – Bilb-weil.de

A Major Literary Debut That Explores Class, Culture, Power, And Desire Among The Ruling And Servant Classes Of Pakistan.In The Spirit Of Joyce S Dubliners And Turgenev S A Sportsman S Sketches, Daniyal Mueenuddin S Collection Of Linked Stories Illuminates A Place And A People Through An Examination Of The Entwined Lives Of Landowners And Their Retainers On The Gurmani Family Farm In The Countryside Outside Of Lahore, Pakistan An Aging Feudal Landlord S Household Staff, The Villagers Who Depend On His Favor, And A Network Of Relations Near And Far Who Have Sought Their Fortune In The Cities Confront The Advantages And Constraints Of Station, The Dissolution Of Old Ways, And The Shock Of Change Mueenuddin Bares At Times Humorously, At Times Tragically The Complexities Of Pakistani Class And Culture And Presents A Vivid Picture Of A Time And A Place, Of The Old Powers And The New, As The Pakistani Feudal Order Is Undermined And Transformed.


10 thoughts on “In Other Rooms, Other Wonders

  1. Will Byrnes Will Byrnes says:

    Mueenuddin has put together a collection of stories that offers a less than flattering portrait of Pakistan But while the social structures that come under his gaze are less than ideal, his writing is top notch, his ability to create memorable and accessible characters is superb The organizing methodology here is that each of the stories connects with K.K Harouni, patriarch of a family in a declining landed class He is almost an innocent, not noticing that his servants are taking extreme, an Mueenuddin has put together a collection of stories that offers a less than flattering portrait of Pakistan But while the social structures that come under his gaze are less than ideal, his writing is top notch, his ability to create memorable and accessible characters is superb The organizing meth...


  2. Teresa Teresa says:

    Perhaps it s not the best idea to learn contemporary sociology from fictional short stories, but it s not a bad place to start if the stories are as good as these Twentieth and early 21st century Pakistan is presented here through the eyes of the landowners and their peons All levels of society the middle class is glancingly represented in the landowners managers work the system, some in order to survive, others to get as much as they can The rich aren t necessarily getting richer, Perhaps it s not the best idea to learn contemporary sociology from fictional short stories, but it s not a bad pl...


  3. Hugh Hugh says:

    This collection of stories is insightful and by turns luminous and bleak Mueenuddin takes the stories of a wide range of people, from poor servants to the landed rich, to form a cross section of Pakistani society, the common thread being their relationship to an old aristocratic land owner and his family It is full of poetic detail and Mueenuddin s characters are complex, fully realised and sympathetic, but the overall picture is of a divided society in which very few stories have happy ending This collection of stories is insightful and by turns luminous and bleak Mueenuddin takes the stories of a wide range of people, from poor servants to the landed rich, to form a cross section of Pakistani ...


  4. Furqan Furqan says:

    Overrated, pretentious twaddle I am surprised at the amount of positive reviews this short story collection seems to be receiving, with some over enthusiastic reviewers comparing Mueenuddin s prose to that of Salman Rushdie, which I find very hilarious Rushdie s prose is complex, lyrical and iridescent, whereas Mueenuddin s prose is restrained in a bad way and the sentences irregular and pointy that it stings your eyes to read them The dialogue could be best described as theatrical and conf Overrated, pretentious twaddle I am surprised at the amount of positive reviews this short story collection seems to be receiving, with some over enthusiastic reviewers comparing Mueenuddin s prose to that of Salman Rushdie, which I find very hilarious Rushdie s prose is complex, lyrical and iridescent, whereas Mueenuddin s prose is restrained in a bad way and the sentences irregular and pointy that it stings your eyes to read them The dialogue could be best described as theatrical and confusing, I kept thinking who on the earth talks like that in Pakistan I concede that few descriptive passages does evoke a sense of rural Pakistan , but it is is hardly worth praising when you consider the flimsy plots, repetitive themes and unconvincing characters.The stor...


  5. Ruby Ruby says:

    Good Read Clear, easy to follow, and very well written Only one small problem and maybe this is a problem that only applies to me I felt like I was reading a book by Jhumpa Lahiri, or Anita Desai, or even Salman Rushdie It seems, to me, that many authors from the far east are feeding off of each others literary techniques What is it about brown authors using the same style of writing The same extended metaphor that goes on for pages The flowery language that s used to describe every Good Read Clear, easy to follow, and very well written Only one small problem and maybe this is a problem that only applies to me I felt like I was reading a book by Jhumpa Lahiri, or Anita Desai, or even Salman Rushdie It seems, to me, that many authors from the far east are feeding off of each others literary techniques What is it about brown authors using the same style of writing The same extended metaphor that goes on for pages The flowery language that s used to describe every tiny detail I know many people appreciate this writing style, but I m a little tired of it I was looking forward to something original hey a book by a Pakistani a...


  6. Tatiana Tatiana says:

    I know next to nothing about Pakistan, aside from the fact that this country seems to be overrun by terrorists, so reading this Pulitzer prize nominated collection of short stories gave me a new perspective on the country and people who live in it The eight loosely interconnected stories revolve around K.K Harouni a rich Pakistani landowner and a network of his servants, employees, relatives and opportunists In Saleema a young maid seeks patronage in Harouni s household in the beds of o I know next to nothing about Pakistan, aside from the fact that this country seems to be overrun by terrorists, so reading this Pulitzer prize nominate...


  7. LindaJ^ LindaJ^ says:

    I m quite ambiguous about this book Stylistically, I liked it The stories engaged me and I found them easy to read But I kept wondering if they were truly representing life in Pakistan The eight stories concern the rich and the poor In many instances, we see the interaction between the two classes and the poor seem to always get screwed in some fashion The most likeable characters for me were the two American women one who initially thought she wanted to marry the pleasant, young, rich P I m quite ambiguous about this book Stylistically, I liked it The stories engaged me and I found them easy to read But I kept wondering if they were truly representing life in Pakistan The eight stories concern the rich and the poor In many instances, we see the interaction between the two classes and the poor seem to always get screwed in some fashion The most likeable characters for me were the two American women one who initially thought she wanted to marry the pleasant, young, rich Pakistani guy and one who actually did marry him perhaps because I could relate to them I know nothing about Pakistan and I hope these stories do not represent what the country is like If so, then it seems that without power, money, and connections, one is in for a pretty miserable existence I purchased this paperback in 2010 on sale It has set on my shelf undisturbed for six years I finally read it as it is one of the September selections for one of my Goodreads groups I loo...


  8. Abby Abby says:

    Most of these stories are not stories Stories have a beginning, middle, and end They are propelled by characterization, suspense, plot, and insights Some of the stories, most notably Our Lady of Paris, seem to be pastiches of thoughts strung together Yes, the author knows what he s talking about As a member of the Pakistani jet set, the son of an American mother and a Pakistani father, and a graduate of Dartmouth and Yale, he is well qualified to write about the gossipy failings and foibles Most of these stories are not stories Stories have a beginning, middle, and end They are propelled by characterization, suspense, plot, and insights Some of the stories, most notably Our Lady of Paris, seem to be pastiches of thoughts strung together Yes, the author knows what he s talking about As a member of the Pakistani jet set, the son of an American mother and a Pakistani father, and a graduate of Dartmouth and Yale, he is well qualified to write a...


  9. Anum Shaharyar Anum Shaharyar says:

    The first time I read this book a few years ago, I hated it with a passion I found it alternatively boring, infuriating, condescending or cynical What did you just make me read I complained to my best friend, who loved this book and was in turn amused and horrified by my vehement dislike of it Read it again she likes to say, whenever I hate a book she loves Because we both have such similar taste in books, it takes a while for us to accept the reality of our conflicting opinions about The first time I read this book a few years ago, I hated it with a passion I found it alternatively boring, infuriating, condescending or cynical What did you just make me read I complained to my best friend, who loved this book and was in turn amused and horrified by my vehement dislike of it Read it again she likes to say, whenever I hate a book she loves Because we both have such similar taste in books, it takes a while for us to accept the reality of our conflicting opinions about the same novel And even though time and experience has proven that rereading a horrible book rarely makes it any better for me, I thought I would give it a try anyway And the best I can now say about it is that I no longer hate it It has progressed from an Ugh, never again to a...


  10. Greg Zimmerman Greg Zimmerman says:

    You ve never read anything like this slim volume of eight interconnected short stories about life in modern Pakistan I can almost guarantee it Rescued from obscurity by its 2009 National Book Award nomination, Daniyal Mueenuddin s In Other Rooms, Other Wonders is a blend of portraits of Pakistani people, both rich and poor The effect is a holistic image of everyday life in a country stuck in an seemingly endless loop of feudalism and class struggle.Mueenuddin, who was born to a Pakistani fath You ve never read anything like this slim volume of eight interconnected short stories about life in modern Pakistan I can almost guarantee it Rescued from obscurity by its 2009 National Book Award nomination, Daniyal Mueenuddin s In Other Rooms, Other Wonders is a blend of portraits of Pakistani people, both rich and poor The effect is a holistic image of everyday life in a country stuck in an seemingly endless loop of feudalism and class struggle.Mueenuddin, who was born to a Pakistani father and American mother, spent seven years after college at Dartmouth trying to untangle the twisted network of kickbacks, favors, and below the level law enforcement at his father s farm in Pakistan This experience the basis for these stories seems to have jaded Muennuddin a bit, as evidenced by a theme setting Punjabi proverb included at the beginning of the book Three things for which we kill ...