{download Best} The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog: And Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist's NotebookAuthor Bruce D. Perry – Bilb-weil.de

What happens when a young brain is traumatized How does terror, abuse, or disaster affect a child s mind and how can that mind recover Child psychiatrist Bruce Perry has helped children faced with unimaginable horror genocide survivors, murder witnesses, kidnapped teenagers, and victims of family violence In The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog, he tells their stories of trauma and transformation through the lens of science, revealing the brain s astonishing capacity for healing Deftly combining unforgettable case histories with his own compassionate, insightful strategies for rehabilitation, Perry explains what exactly happens to the brain when a child is exposed to extreme stress and reveals the unexpected measures that can be taken to ease a child s pain and help him grow into a healthy adult Through the stories of children who recover physically, mentally, and emotionally from the most devastating circumstances, Perry shows how simple things like surroundings, affection, language, and touch can deeply impact the developing brain, for better or for worse In this deeply informed and moving book, Bruce Perry dramatically demonstrates that only when we understand the science of the mind can we hope to heal the spirit of even the most wounded child


10 thoughts on “The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog: And Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist's Notebook

  1. Miranda Reads Miranda Reads says:

    Absolutely fascinating The truth is, you cannot love yourself unless you have been loved and are loved The capacity to love cannot be built in isolation. Whewww, this one was an emotional doozy I was equally fascinated and horrified by what the author witnessed and treated.There s the case from the title where a marginally well meaning old man finds himself in charge of a young boy the grandson of a deceased girlfriend Not knowing how to raise children, but having plenty of experie Absolutely fascinating The truth is, you cannot love yourself unless you have been loved and are loved The capacity to love cannot be built in isolation. Whewww, this one was an emotional doozy I was equally fascinated and horrified by what the author witnessed and treated.There s the case from the title where a marginally well meaning old man finds himself in charge of a young boy the grandson of a deceased girlfriend Not knowing how to raise children, but having plenty of experience raising dogs, he decides to use the methods he knew best For years, the child was treated with as much love and care as he gave his dogswhich is to say not much And as a result, Dr Bruce Perry stumbles into a hospital only to find a feces throwing, unsocialized and feral child locked to a hospital bed But with immediate placement into foster care and a few okay, quite a few sessions, the child is now rehabilitated Now that is one just one of the many cases the author describes Biology isn t just genes playing out some unalterable script It is sensitive to the world around it. Dr Perry talks about the therapy triage he did with the 21 Waco cult children, the analysis of a teen psychopath who murdered and raped two girls , the Russian orphan who had no adult socialization for the first three years of his life and the other orphan children began making their own language and so muchThehealthy relationships a child has, thelikely he will be to recover from trauma and thrive Relationships are the agents of change and the most powerful therapy is human love. This book was riveting.He speaks of clinical studies and cases through a very down to earth way much to my relief The cases he speaks of were absolutely fascinating I truly wish this book was four times longer Audiobook CommentsRead by Danny Campbell and he nailed it The perfect mixture of tone and pacing Really well read.YouTube Blog Instagram Twitter Snapchat miranda.reads Happy Reading


  2. Petra-X Petra-X says:

    This is a book about damaged children and the psychiatrist who tried to help them The two saddest stories are the little girl, a toddler really, who at 3 was being prepared to testify against the man as the only witness who had murdered her mother in front of her and then cut her throat She was too young to know about death and had tried to wake her mother and feed her, give her milk and then laid down on her and sung her lullabies The other was the 21 Waco children that David Koresh had ta This is a book about damaged children and the psychiatrist who tried to help them The two saddest stories are the little girl, a toddler really, who at 3 was being prepared to testify against the man as the only witness who had murdered her mother in front of her and then cut her throat She was too young to know about death and had tried to wake her mother and feed her, give her milk and then laid down on her and sung her lullabies The other was the 21 Waco children that David Koresh had taught to distrust everyone outside the compound and, if faced with them, to commit suicide They watched each other which meant that they tried to preserve the evil culture that was the only one they knew They supported each other to begin with in a very malign way, but later, this mutual support aided them in their journey towards mental health.The author is an immensely caring man, and one who put aside objectivity for involvement ind these children s lives How did he ever sleep at night What did he dream of He too must have needed therapy Maybe that s what the book was


  3. Greta G Greta G says:

    Last Saturday, I was awakened from my sleep at five in the morning by strange noises It took me a while to realize that it was my son who had just returned from a night out with his friends, and had a bout of hiccups He has a place of his own, but every now and then, he sleeps at his old folks home, so I usually don t expect nightly visitors Anyhow, I went upstairs to have a glass of water, and he followed me upstairs our sleeping rooms are downstairs You woke me with your hiccups I d Last Saturday, I was awakened from my sleep at five in the morning by strange noises It took me a while to realize that it was my son who had just returned from a night out with his friends, and had a bout of hiccups He has a place of his own, but every now and then, he sleeps at his old folks home, so I usually don t expect nightly visitors Anyhow, I went upstairs to have a glass of water, and he followed me upstairs our sleeping rooms are downstairs You woke me with your hiccups I did not hiccup Yes, you did Anyway, how was your night Oh, it was really fun How was your evening Nice I started to read a new book, about traumatized children The Boy Who was raised as a Dog It s written by a psychiatrist Have you heard about it No, I don t know that one Nice title Sounds great It is I ve read the first story It was about an eight year old girl who was sexually abused for two years by the sixteen year old son of the babysitter, who sometimes left the children under his care He tied her and her little brother up and used toys Stop That s enough I really don t want to hear stories about abused little girls at five in the morning when I have to go to sleep Okay I understand I ve also started the second story about a three year old girl who witnessed her mother being raped and murdered and has her own throat cut and was left for Mom Please stop I really don t want to hear this right now I m tired, and I m going to sleep Good night Good night son, I m glad you had such a great time tonight Sleep well Review to come


  4. Thomas Thomas says:

    A thorough, interdisciplinary book about childhood trauma written with compassion and eloquence, The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog amazed me with its depth and insight Bruce Perry, an experienced psychiatrist, shares many case studies about kids who have suffered horrible adversity, and he discusses their development and recovery with intelligence and an apparent kindness One quote that stood out to me about how we should treat people who self medicate and self harm with understanding instead of A thorough, interdisciplinary book about childhood trauma written with compassion and eloquence, The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog amazed me with its depth and insight Bruce Perry, an experienced psychiatrist, shares many case studies about kids who have suffered horrible adversity, and he discusses their development and recovery with intelligence and an apparent kindness One quote that stood out to me about how we should treat people who self medicate and self harm with understanding instead of judgmentWhile self mutilation, too, is often seen as an act of rebellion or attention seeking, in most cases it is probably better understood as an attempt at self medication as well Cutting releases brain opioids, which makes it especially attractive to those who have been previously traumatized and found relief in dissociation The same is true of people who use drugs like heroin or Oxycontin Contrary to popular belief, most people who try these drugs do not find them overwhelmingly blissful In fact, most people don t like the numbing sensation they produce But those who suffer the after effects of severe stress and trauma are likely to find the substances soothing and comforting, not deadening Perry weaves together neuroscience and human relationships throughout The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog He discusses the brain s malleability in the early years of development, and he also provides perspective into how healthful relationships can ameliorate people s neurological, physical, and mental health By delving into a wide array of scenarios unintentional neglect, constant sexual abuse, cult upbringings, andand by treating every child s story with seriousness and tact, Perry reveals his skill as a doctor and as a kind human being Another passage that stood out to me, about trauma and human relationshipsTrauma and our responses to it cannot be understood outside the context of human relationships Whether people have survived an earthquake or have been repeatedly sexual abused, what matters most is how those experiences affect their relationships to their loved ones, to themselves and to the world The most traumatic aspects of all disasters involve the shattering of human connections.As a result, recovery from trauma and neglect is also all about relationships rebuilding trust, regaining confidence, returning to a sense of security and reconnecting to love Of course, medications can help relieve symptoms and talking to a therapist can be incredibly useful But healing and recovery are impossible even with the best medications and therapy in the world without lasting, caring connections to others Overall, one of my favorite Psychology reads thus far Perry offers an astute, humane look into the therapeutic process while also encouraging productive change in the way our society cares for traumatized children Recommended for anyone interested in kids, psychology, neuroscience, and post traumatic growth


  5. BAM The Bibliomaniac BAM The Bibliomaniac says:

    Bruce Perry is an absolute godsend to the hundreds of children and families he s helped I wish we could clone him He s absolutely brilliant, charming, empathetic, and has no qualms with thinking outside the box.


  6. Tanya W Tanya W says:

    A very impactful read The most practical thing I think I can take from it is a greater compassion for my fellow men We really don t know what people have gone through to contribute to who they are These stories make me not want to judge anyone some bad people experienced trauma and neglect to the degree that their brain was permanently affected I wish I could do something to make life better for or be a friend to some of these unusual, and socially misfit individuals Thank goodness many A very impactful read The most practical thing I think I can take from it is a greater compassion for my fellow men We really don t know what people have gone through to contribute to who they are These stories make me not want to judge anyone some bad people experienced trauma and neglect to the degree that their brain was permanently affected I wish I could do something to make life better for or be a friend to some of these unusual, and socially misfit individuals Thank goodness many people who experience these types of trauma have some avenues to better their lives.I believe I could be less judgmental toward a person who commits violent or murderous acts, realizing that they may have experienced trauma so severe that it affected their brain, and all their life decisions Perhaps many of the most violent in our society are messed up in a way that they are less accountable for their actions I hope not to have to forgive such people but if I cross paths with them or am harmed or loved ones are harmed by them, I hope to have a merciful attitude


  7. Melissa Melissa says:

    Bruce Perry treats children who have suffered childhood trauma using a neurosequential approach This approach supposes that as the brain grows from the most basic deep structures to the most complex outer structures basically from the inside out and from the bottom up in the first 3 years of life, trauma at any phase of that development shapes or prevents the proper physiological development of the brain area that is developing Because the higher brain structure development depends on develo Bruce Perry treats children who have suffered childhood trauma using a neurosequential approach This approach supposes that as the brain grows from the most basic deep structures to the most complex outer structures basically from the inside out and from the bottom up in the first 3 years of life, trauma at any phase of that development shapes or prevents the proper physiological development of the brain area that is developing Because the higher brain structure development depends on development in the areas beneath it, trauma in childhood can affect brain development long after The treatment of these children depends on determining how the trauma sensitized the stress response system and how the children coped with the trauma, such as disassociating, and retraining the brain beginning from when the trauma occurred This may include rocking, music and movement classes, life skills training, CBT etc The final chapter gives suggestions for minimizing childhood trauma in our society emphasizing that the breakup of the EXTENDED family and our increasing social isolation are increasing our risk Appreciate the author s assertion that humaneness is learned, not inborn, that we cannot love ourselves unless we are loved by someone else, and that the key to healthy individuals and society lies in numerous strong relationships Excellent insightful book


  8. Ali Ali says:

    I borrowed this book from my supervisor when I interned in a pediatric psychiatric hospital, and I pretty much read it in one sitting The book completely changed the way I looked at patients Before, I saw them as children who were reacting to terribly traumatic experiences Now, I understand that the traumatic experiences literally changed the way their brain functions It explains why so many therapeutic interventions fail our techniques aren t right We re treating the cancer with cold medi I borrowed this book from my supervisor when I interned in a pediatric psychiatric hospital, and I pretty much read it in one sitting The book completely changed the way I looked at patients Before, I saw them as children who were reacting to terribly traumatic experiences Now, I understand that the traumatic experiences literally changed the way their brain functions It explains why so many therapeutic interventions fail our techniques aren t right We re treating the cancer with cold medicine Unless medical facilities and outpatient clinics are given the funding needed to create the right intervention, these children have a much harder battle ahead of them


  9. Miriam Mathew Miriam Mathew says:

    Non fiction books, as a general rule, bore me The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dogis a non fiction book The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog did not bore me.To the contrary, it fascinated me It incited a hundred different emotions that I didn t think was possible with a non fiction book It made me smile made me cry It punched me right in the chest and soothed me the next It was utter perfection The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog is a book of beauty and one of the most beautiful things about it was how t Non fiction books, as a general rule, bore me The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dogis a non fiction book The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog did not bore me.To the contrary, it fascinated me It incited a hundred different emotions that I didn t think was possible with a non fiction book It made me smile made me cry It punched me right in the chest and soothed me the next It was utter perfection The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog is a book of beauty and one of the most beautiful things about it was how the author wrote it for everyone, from the simpletons of this worlds AKA me to general practitioners of psychiatry to understand Most non fiction books are written under the assumption that their readers will know what they re talking about or at the very least have the basic level of knowledge So because, I had no inkling about neurology or child psychiatry, I went into TBWWRAAD withthan a little trepidation But I didn t need to worry Everything was explained to me succintly I understood all of it.The language wasn t dumbed down nor were the concepts introduced in TBWWRAAD simplified in any way It was simply written to be understood The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog is something I would recommend to everyone for a five star read There was so much I learned from reading this The detailed explanations of how the brain works and the examples that the author put in there made me realize how significant trauma can be and how seriously it could impact a young child s mind.Five StarsAs a sidenote, I would say this is good material for the Nature v.s Nurture debate A good source


  10. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    really interesting, heart wrenching stories favorite quotes More than in any other species, human young are born vulnerable and dependent Pregnancy and early childhood are tremendous energy drains on the mother and, indirectly, on the larger family group But despite the severe pain of childbirth, the numerous discomforts of pregnancy and breast feeding, and the loud, continuous demands of a newborn, human mothers overwhelmingly tend to devote themselves to comforting, feeding an protecting really interesting, heart wrenching stories favorite quotes More than in any other species, human young are born vulnerable and dependent Pregnancy and early childhood are tremendous energy drains on the mother and, indirectly, on the larger family group But despite the severe pain of childbirth, the numerous discomforts of pregnancy and breast feeding, and the loud, continuous demands of a newborn, human mothers overwhelmingly tend to devote themselves to comforting, feeding an protecting their young Indeed, most do so happily we find it pathological when one does not To a Martian or even to many nonparents this behavior might seem like a mystery What could prompt parents to give up sleep, sex, friends, personal time and virtually every other pleasure in life to meet the demands of a a small, often irritatingly noisy, incontinent, needy being The secret is that caring for children, is, in many ways, indescribably pleasurable Our brains rewards us for interacting with our children, especially infants their scent, the cooing sounds the y make when they are calm, their smooth skin and especially, their faces are designed to fill us with joy What we call cuteness is actually an evolutionary adaptation that helps ensure that parents will care for their children, that babies will get their needs met, and parents will take on this seemingly thankless task with pleasure