[[ read online books ]] The Crow Eaters Author Bapsi Sidhwa – Bilb-weil.de

At The Dawn Of The 20th Century In Pakistan, Freddy Junglewalla Moves His Family Pregnant Wife, Baby Daughter, And Jerbanoo, His Rotund Mother In Law From Their Ancestral Forest Home To Cosmopolitan Lahore He Opens A Store, And As His Fortunes Grow, So Does The Animosity Between Freddy And His Mother In Law While Freddy Prospers Under British Rule, Life With The Domineering Jerbanoo Is Another Matter Entirely This Exuberant Novel, Full Of Rollicking Humor, Paints A Vivid Picture Of Life In The Parsee Community.


10 thoughts on “The Crow Eaters

  1. Sundus HameedUllah Khan Sundus HameedUllah Khan says:

    The Crow Eaters is an excellent novel that skillfully describes family problems It addresses serious historical and cultural issues of Parsi Community in a humorous way Thoroughly enjoyed reading it


  2. Aayan Mirza Aayan Mirza says:

    An interesting story who s only direction and purpose seemed to be keep moving foward The Parsi culture, the Indian history it is set in, and the varied and well developed characters, all very well managed to keep things afloat in a very snail paced, rather ordinary plot Didn t mind much the extravagant writing, a trait common in the sub continental writers of the olden days, and found it rather beautiful The book had its moments, but forced me at times to pick up other books in parallel to i An interesting story who s only direction and purpose seemed to be keep moving foward The Parsi culture, the Indian history it is set in, and the varied and well developed characters, all very well managed to keep things afloat in a very snail paced, rather ordinary plot Didn t mind much the extravagant writing, a trait common in the sub continental writers of the olden days, and found it rather beautiful The book had its moments, but forced me at times to pick up other books in parallel t...


  3. Perry Whitford Perry Whitford says:

    A young Parsi merchant called Faredoon Freddy Junglewalla from Central India drags his wife, child and indomitable mother in law over a thousand miles in a rickety cart to start a new life in Lahore The Junglewalla s swell the size of the small community from four families to five, but despite being taunted ascrow eatersby the local Sikh children due to the volume of their conversation they find a tolerant home and a good place to conduct business.Unfortunately for Freddy, he can t alwa A young Parsi merchant called Faredoon Freddy Junglewalla from Central India drags his wife, child and indomitable mother in law over a thousand miles in a rickety cart to start a new life in Lahore The Junglewalla s swell the size of the small community from four families to five, but despite being taunted ascrow eatersby the local Sikh children due to the volume of their conversation they find a tolerant home and a good place to conduct business.Unfortunately for Freddy, he can t always find the same comfort inside his own home His mother in law, Jerbanoo, becomes the bane of his life, even as his wealth and influence grow in the community and beyond Swindled by a traveling insurance salesman, Freddy considers both his wants and his needs to contrive a drastic, decidedly non Indian solution to his problems The Crow Eaters is that most difficult of narratives to pull off by any novelist, let alone a first timer as Sidhwa was a breezy, light hearted picaresque on ...


  4. Sarah Sarah says:

    I LOVE DIS BOOKI ENJOYED IT ALOTBUT FROM LITERARY POINT OF VIEW ITS BASED ON RELATIONSHIPS , MARXISM , N SOCIETY FROM PAKISTANI CONTEXT


  5. Nusrah Javed Nusrah Javed says:

    I have a beef with South East Asian authors It seems that the ones i have read jhumpa lahiri, the god of small things deliberately have underlying depressing themes to their novels I mean it makes sense, misery is easier to do than satire or comedy But it always makes me feel like my emotions are being exploited As if I am being told how to feel something, and I dislike that immensely THIS BOOK, however though, was none of the above It was satire done so well, that i found myself laughin I have a beef with South East Asian authors It seems that the ones i have read jhumpa lahiri, the god of small things deliberately have underlying depressing themes to their novels I mean it makes sense, misery is easier to do than satire or comedy Bu...


  6. Wsm Wsm says:

    Bapsi Sidhwa is well known as Pakistan s first major English language novelist.She belongs to the tiny Parsi community whose numbers continue to dwindle.This book is an entertaining account of their way...


  7. Samreen Samreen says:

    A story about a parsee family in Lahore back in 1920s This novel was my first introduction to any parsee family, their customs and their religion off course very well written It will make you laugh and it will make you cry Highly recommended for those who want to read a novel full of knowledge.


  8. Sitara Kashif Sitara Kashif says:

    i often wonder how can bapsi sidhwa manages to write such wonderful stories. the dying man is talking sense to his family the beginning is entirely different from what turns the novel takes immediately after the opening Freddy famous as jungle walla sahib made his way towards Lahore where he found his great fortune he manages to live in the swirl of the artificial life around him and he becomes extremely cunning later on i loved that part of the novel where he is desperate to get i often wonder how can bapsi sidhwa manages to write such wonderful stories. the dying man is talking sense to his family the beginning is entirely different f...


  9. Christiane Christiane says:

    This is a muchlight hearted read than the Ice Candy Man Cracking India Although not totally devoid of tragedy it is mostly funny and entertaining while providing some insight into Indian society and especially into the Parsee community.It tells the story of the ups and downs of the Junglewallas, a Parsee family who move from Central India to Lahore to seek and find their fortunes.Pride of place is given to the histrionic, maddening, indestructible Jerbanoo, mother in law and bane of p This is a muchlight hearted read than the Ice Candy Man Cracking India Although not totally devoid of tragedy it is mostly funny and entertaining while providing some insight into Indian society and especially into the Parsee community.It tells the story of the ups and downs of the Junglewallas, a Parsee family who move from Central India to Lahore to seek and find their fortunes.Pride of place is given to the histrionic, maddening, indestructible Jerbanoo, mother in law and bane of patriarc...