Free eBook Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence - From Domestic Abuse to Political Terror – Bilb-weil.de

When Trauma and Recovery was first published in , it was hailed as a groundbreaking work In the intervening years, Herman s volume has changed the way we think about and treat traumatic events and trauma victims In a new afterword, Herman chronicles the incredible response the book has elicited and explains how the issues surrounding the topic have shifted within the clinical community and the culture at large Trauma and Recovery brings a new level of understanding to a set of problems usually considered individually Herman draws on her own cutting edge research in domestic violence as well as on the vast literature of combat veterans and victims of political terror, to show the parallels between private terrors such as rape and public traumas such as terrorism The book puts individual experience in a broader political frame, arguing that psychological trauma can be understood only in a social context Meticulously documented and frequently using the victims own words as well as those from classic literary works and prison diaries, Trauma and Recovery is a powerful work that will continue to profoundly impact our thinking


10 thoughts on “Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence - From Domestic Abuse to Political Terror

  1. jo jo says:

    i just taught this for the first time for some reason, this time around the book had a tremendously disruptive impact on me it was, simply put, like going through a trauma experience the last part, about the three stages of recovery, gave me palpable relief, as if i were going through recovery myself as i read the book with the class.reading it with a group made a huge difference at least some of the students experienced some level of traumatization it was important to debrief at the end s i just taught this for the first time for some reason, this time around the book had a tremendously disruptive impact on me it was, simply put, like going through a trauma experience the last part, about the three stages of recovery, gave me palpable relief, as if i were going through recovery myself as i read the book with the class.reading it with a group made a huge difference at least some of the students experienced some level of traumatization it was important to debrief at the end some felt compelled to share stories all reported discussing the book outside of class the level of attentiveness during discussion was so high you could tell who had done the reading and who hadn t this book is not about a generically traumatizing world it s about regularly misdiagnosed mental pain the number of mental health professionals who are willing to journey with a patient to the roots of trauma is minimal the number of those who have the competence, training, and wisdom to do so safely and successfully is so tiny, if you find one it s a miracle most mental health professionals will misdiagnose post traumatic syndromes most mental health professionals will slap demeaning and belittling diagnoses on you and declare you sick for life and doomed to a lifetime of maintenance drug use most won t even feel the need to talk to you it s amazing the way trauma imposes its stealth on the world of healers the refusal to recognize it and deal with it is as persistent in healers as it is in sufferers a student was brave enough and healed enough to discuss a traumatic experience of their own in class gently, we asked questions gently, we helped them see how they were reproducing in their narrative the telltale symptoms of the traumatized person it was nothing people have it much worse i am ashamed of my reaction i am trying not to give in to weakness and fear it was pretty intense, and i hope healing, for all of us the student s openness helped us see that they are okay one can experience trauma and be okay after reading the horrors depicted in this book what a relief.there are mental health professionals who know how to deal with trauma and if you have a traumatized past you should look for them at the very least, you should look for a survivor group the internet will do in a pinch trauma doesn t heal in isolation trauma is a dramatic break in relationship with the world, with others, with the self, with god and can only heal in relationship there are aspects in which this book is dated its feminism is a bit black and white, and ignores the myriad ways in which gender related trauma cross pollinates across gender boundaries such as they are they constantly reshape themselves anyway men get beaten, threatened, and raped too women go to war violent men are often themselves trauma victims the low level traumatization in which all women are steeped qua women has a low level traumatic correspondent in guys if 1 in x women will be raped in their lifetimes, 1 in x guys will be raping a woman in their lifetimes as JH demonstrates when she talks of war, the perpetration of violence leaves the perpetrator scarred yet, she does not extend this observation to civilian life this is a mistake we try to understand and forgive the horrors soldiers perpetrate under orders on the battlefield whatever that is that specific spacial designation no longer exists , but we are loath to understand the pressures that push men to take their rage out on women, children, other men, and, increasingly, strange bystanders in our civilian communities what lies behind school shootings and other civilian rampages diagnosing and medicating mental pain away, clearly, is not working we have to restructure our culture of psychic healing from the ground up it has to be based on deep listening, deep investigation, and a genuine, long term commitment to the well being of the patient too few graduate programs in psychology train therapists in the arts of deep listening and deep therapy this is a crisis we can no longer afford to ignore


  2. Thomas Thomas says:

    I first fanboy squealed on page 11, when Judith Lewis Herman created a connection between mental illness and feminism, two of my favorite topics In the first third of Trauma and Recovery, Herman discusses the history of trauma and how trauma relates to many other concepts, such as politics and warfare In contemporary society people insulate and isolate the topic of mental illness with alarming speed, so delving into its pervasiveness in all areas of life brought its magnitude back into focus I first fanboy squealed on page 11, when Judith Lewis Herman created a connection between mental illness and feminism, two of my favorite topics In the first third of Trauma and Recovery, Herman discusses the history of trauma and how trauma relates to many other concepts, such as politics and warfare In contemporary society people insulate and isolate the topic of mental illness with alarming speed, so delving into its pervasiveness in all areas of life brought its magnitude back into focus Depression, for example, is not just an illness that affects people because they might feel sad out of the blue depression and its symptoms have a rich history and an unfortunate stake in several domains.Herman also writes in depth about trauma itself, which made me love Trauma and Recovery, even as it tore me apart With fluid and poignant prose, she sets forth a tripartite recovery model establishing a safe environment for the victim, unearthing the trauma and working through its emotional wounds, and moving forward to maintain a new post trauma life that expands upon the experiences of the victim As someone who has dealt with trauma and wants to one day work as a therapist, this book resonated with methan any textbook or piece of nonfiction I ve ever read Herman explains concepts with confidence and clarity, and her guiding tone shows that she empathizes with victims and wishes to support them throughout the recovery process.So many little things added to my affection for Herman s most well known work As an English and Psychology double major, I felt joy every time she used books written by authors like Woolf and O Brien to provide examples for psychological ideas She drives home the idea that mental health and politics remain connected because mental health intrinsically relates to oppressed people and the blows they suffer Herman ends the book by commenting on the influential role of therapists not only do they help victims regain control of their lives, but they also act as witnesses to victims stories They testify to the truth, and they fight for the clients they work it, no matter what the cost.Overall, an inspiring and enlightening read Trauma and Recovery was published quite awhile ago, which shows through its use of gender pronouns men are also abused, and women serve in the armed forces as well but the book still raises a wealth of information and understanding It has revitalized my passion for psychology and the field of mental illness, and I m certain I will revisit it in the future review cross posted on my blog, the quiet voice


  3. Charlotte Charlotte says:

    This is an EXCELLENT book I d place it up there with van der Kolk s The Body Keeps The Score and Bancroft s Why Does He Do That as one of the best written and most informative books I ve read on abuse and trauma I loved that Herman s perspective is overtly anti oppression speaking specifically to sexism and racism and anti war and she speaks compellingly to the way that trauma is perpetuated through these systems I ll certainly be returning to this book.


  4. Tinea Tinea says:

    I can t do this book justice with a review Feminist, short, and packed with information about what PTSD is, how it comes about, and how to heal it Applied philosophy resulting in the sort of holy shit moments that had me dragging friends out on long walks around lakes and organizing two person slumber parties just so I d have a chance to share some of these lessons learned To adequately summarize this info, I d basically need to copy the whole book here, so just go out and read it This bo I can t do this book justice with a review Feminist, short, and packed with information about what PTSD is, how it comes about, and how to heal it Applied philosophy resulting in the sort of holy shit moments that had me dragging friends out on long walks around lakes and organizing two person slumber parties just so I d have a chance to share some of these lessons learned To adequately summarize this info, I d basically need to copy the whole book here, so just go out and read it This book is hella old and revolutionized the diagnosis of women s problems hysteria borderline personality disorder as world problems Thank you Judith Herman, I recognize a debt of gratitude This world is super fucked, and it s really important that we have some skillz to understand that and deal with how it manifests in our bodies See also Aftershock Confronting Trauma in a Violent World A Guide for Activists and Their Allies for apractical manual


  5. Shira Shira says:

    update on this review 15 Sept, 12017 HE, about 2 years or so after first read at the bottom So I guess I m in Stage 3, now Original review, circa 2010 5This book, for me, was a horrible read Horribly accurate Yet hopeful as well.Horrible to see that I am not so different after all I see myself in every comment she makes on adults who survived long term trauma as children Horrible to see that my experience is not so different Yet hopeful to see that there are ways of solving the update on this review 15 Sept, 12017 HE, about 2 years or so after first read at the bottom So I guess I m in Stage 3, now Original review, circa 2010 5This book, for me, was a horrible read Horribly accurate Yet hopeful as well.Horrible to see that I am not so different after all I see myself in every comment she makes on adults who survived long term trauma as children Horrible to see that my experience is not so different Yet hopeful to see that there are ways of solving the problem, living normally just that ignoring it is not one of those ways Most irritating Especially after burn out has twice stopped me from working enough to distract myself from my distracting memories.She mentions The Body Keeps the Score Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma in her 2015 epilogue, and that book seems to recommend both movement and writing both of which helped me until I had to get back to sitting in a chair looking for a job all day long I seem to be stuck in Stage 2, and worst of all, I read over and over again that either in writing or in talking therapy, I must now stop living in my head and move back into my body I have always found it easier to forget to eat then to bother about my body Work has always been a useful form of escape, until now Ok, not so much once I get to about the intermediate level of just about anything, it seems no longer to hold my interest, and I find myself assaulted by unwanted memories that refuse to go back into their Blankety Blank Blank boxes Irritatingly enough, this is the first place I have seen such a thing predicted.She even has the gall to predict and counter my unique perspective on my right to choose when to die, and how Apparently this too is normal for folks like me Huh So much for being misunderstood I guess she has us pegged, finally, Thank the non existent God Finally someone actually documents what we go through, and tells us it is a normal response to a hideous start in life Ok, now, on to how to fix the problem start with saftey years of martial arts did help some , get a good therapist, talk, write, and move your body And remember that faking functionality will not work forever.Peace,Shira27.10.12015 HE update, 15.9.12017 HEI see what a difference a perceptive, attentive and flexible therapist can make first of all, one does not have to sit and purposely relive the entire series of traumatic events, which in any case is impossible to do on a conscious level for dealing with childhood abuse, as there are just too many events Perceptiveness What my newest therapist told me that made a difference was that there was no need to go back through all of those events, because I was already reliving my traumas every day, each time I am triggered it remained, however, to follow those triggers back to the originating event s and deal with those Naturally, I tried to squirm out of it by skipping past whenever possible, and that is where the attentiveness comes in she always redirects me where other therapists let or even encourage me to avoid sitting with that trigger, and following it back to the source event s to figure out what is happening to the child me, and then Flexibility this therapist had to dispense with Affirmations, as I pointed out that they are very counter productive for me So instead, she had me develop an imagination I had years ago of myself as several people, one very young 4 yr old , one about 15, another about 17, and another older, maybe 23 or so years old She added a Parental figure, and told me to look for the frightened 4 year old, and find out where she was, and what she wanted, and then have my own Inner Parent explain to my wounded 4 year old that she I would take care of it, and keep her me safe.After some time, this works Now, I know that when fireworks loud noises shouting happens, it is not just me there and then, but my inner 4 yr old hiding while hearing my mom being beaten, and my adult me can say I got this, you are safe and excuse myself to keep from being further triggered.Finally, after months of work, and then being told that mourning the loss of childhoon, protection by parents, etc, is in fact necessary, I began a long web search which seems to confirm , and found this website as a nice To Do List to check off because I like to know when I m done this helps others,Shira


  6. Emma Deplores stg2bio.co Censorship Emma Deplores stg2bio.co Censorship says:

    I read this for work purposes and found it a helpful and thought provoking resource, a book I ll likely want to refer to again in the future First published in 1992, this was apparently a ground breaking work, but while there s been plenty of research into trauma since then if you can recommend a good follow up to this one, please let me know , it has stood the test of time so far Certainly it rings true to my experience.As you would expect from the title, the primary focus of the book is on I read this for work purposes and found it a helpful and thought provoking resource, a book I ll likely want to refer to again in the future First published in 1992, this was apparently a ground breaking work, but while there s been plenty of research into trauma since then if you can recommend a good follow up to this one, please let me know , it has stood the test of time so far Certainly it rings true to my experience.As you would expect from the title, the primary focus of the book is on describing the effects and symptoms of psychological trauma, and the stages of a successful recovery It can at times be tough reading emotionally, even though it s not a book focused on case studies or anecdotes indeed, my only quibble with the book is that I would ve liked to see the specific cases, set off in short blockquotes, expanded and integratedinto the book But the educated reader will find it accessible this is an academic book, but of the best kind, written in clear and engaging language It would make worthwhile reading not just for therapists and students, but also for trauma survivors, their loved ones, and other professionals The author sees the big picture only a small part of the book is geared specifically to therapists and I found that very helpful in providing a framework for understanding things I have seen and heard from various people.Another aspect of this book that bears mentioning, and which I appreciate, is Dr Herman s unabashedly feminist perspective The book addresses and draws on research from many sources of trauma, from combat to concentration camps, but the author s experience seems to be primarily with survivors of sexual abuse in childhood, and it is the unfortunatelyeveryday sorts of trauma that the book comes back to She makes no bones about the fact that recognizing trauma brought on by rape, domestic violence, or child sex abuse is political admitting that these things happen, primarily to women and girls and in large numbers, and that those experiences matter, that it is serious, is political And that affects everyone involved.At any rate, this is an excellent book, very informative and thorough Reading it gave me a better understanding of people I work with and made me think about areas where I might do better Now, off to apply this knowledge without overstepping and pretending to be a therapist which I definitely am not


  7. Lightreads Lightreads says:

    Ah ha, there it is I ve been looking for this book for about five years now Not this book, I mean, but a book that frames a discussion of post trauma pathologies with feminist discourse without beingwhat s the word I m looking for Annoying This book does that It s fascinating, actually, starting in with the history of trauma s emergence into public consciousness in connection with successive political movements secular humanism, postwar relief, feminism Then on through symptomolog Ah ha, there it is I ve been looking for this book for about five years now Not this book, I mean, but a book that frames a discussion of post trauma pathologies with feminist discourse without beingwhat s the word I m looking for Annoying This book does that It s fascinating, actually, starting in with the history of trauma s emergence into public consciousness in connection with successive political movements secular humanism, postwar relief, feminism Then on through symptomology, case histories, and treatments There are two central arguments The one about trauma research and treatment as politically charged acts isn t particularly new to me, but it s one of those things that doesn t so much need repeating as shouting from the rooftops And the argument that the complex post traumatic response to prolonged violence is pathologically distinct from classic single trauma PTSD is also familiar, but nicely presented.The whole thing is solid, deftly told, agonizing in places And she talks about soldiers and battered women in ways that are illuminating, rather than pat or oppositional This is one of those books about gender that spends all it s time talking about people, if you know what I mean The only flaw isn t actually one this was written in the mid 90 s, so it s missing both a boatload of pharmacological and neurological data and insights on the most recent developments in the political aspects of trauma.Highly recommended


  8. Susan Susan says:

    This was assigned reading in my first year of graduate school, and eight years later, I still refer to it It s my professional bible Judith Herman has written the quintessential book on trauma She somehow has managed to convey all the complex elements of this phenomenon in less than 250 pages She also as far as I know was one of the first to differentiate between single incident trauma and ongoing trauma She writes in a style that is simple enough for anyone to read but does not sound sim This was assigned reading in my first year of graduate school, and eight years later, I still refer to it It s my professional bible Judith Herman has written the quintessential book on trauma She somehow has managed to convey all the complex elements of this phenomenon in less than 250 pages She also as far as I know was one of the first to differentiate between single incident trauma and ongoing trauma She writes in a style that is simple enough for anyone to read but does not sound simplistic She illustrates her points with poignant examples drawn from diverse sources, from Elie Wiesel to Winston Smith I love this book


  9. Erin Drake Erin Drake says:

    It is easy to see why Judith Herman s visionary book Trauma and Recovery is considered a classic in the field of psychology In her work, Herman describes the conditions that create posttraumatic stress and then details a path of recovery She explores the many manifestations of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder within the human mind, body and spirit then identifies the interwoven and overlapping stages of trauma recovery with clarity and purpose Most notably, Herman describes the difficulty of t It is easy to see why Judith Herman s visionary book Trauma and Recovery is considered a classic in the field of psychology In her work, Herman describes the conditions that create posttraumatic stress and then details a path of recovery She explores the many manifestations of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder within the human mind, body and spirit then identifies the interwoven and overlapping stages of trauma recovery with clarity and purpose Most notably, Herman describes the difficulty of telling the truth of suffering and the complementary difficulty of hearing the truth and helping those in pain to tell their stories She understands that human beings naturally recoil from pain of any kind and cautiously emphasizes the importance of community in healing traumatic grief In the second half of this book, the author suggests that recovery typically follows a process during which the survivor attains safety, goes through a period of remembrance and mourning, and reconnects with himself or herself and the world around him or her Herman continuously emphasizes that these stages are not fixed and predictable, but rather individual in nature, significantly influenced by one s environment, and can occur simultaneously She also reasons that since the effect of the trauma is to disempower and disconnect the victims from others, healing from the effects of the trauma means that the victim becomes empowered and is able to form new, healthy attachments In considering the role of community in the recovery process, Herman suggests that group psychotherapy can provide survivors with a needed sense of commonality She is, however, very careful to point out that survivor group composition and focus be based largely on the client s present stage of recovery I found this warning difficult to fully accept as I wondered if recovery is so multi faceted and its stages are so intermingled, who could determine just where a person is at in their recovery And wouldn t the benefit of belonging to a community of others with similar experiences outweigh the psychological risk of being re traumatized by a person in an earlier stage of recovery I still don t have an answer for this one but overall, Judith Herman s work presents fresh new ideas about trauma, survival, and healing with a bold and fearless voice This book is an intelligent resource for people who work with trauma survivors though some chapters may be too academic to be used as a self help tool


  10. Elle Elle says:

    Don t let the rating lead you to believe that this book is not essential and extremely helpful reading on trauma and the challenges it poses to individuals in healing The reasons I did not rate it higher was the pathologizing use of diagnostic categories, an emphasis on the healing relationship that tended to the therapist 4xthan the survivor 16 pages to 4 respectively, but arguably because of the intended audience and the expertise of the author , and the distorting separation of the st Don t let the rating lead you to believe that this book is not essential and extremely helpful reading on trauma and the challenges it poses to individuals in healing The reasons I did not rate it higher was the pathologizing use of diagnostic categories, an emphasis on the healing relationship that tended to the therapist 4xthan the survivor 16 pages to 4 respectively, but arguably because of the intended audience and the expertise of the author , and the distorting separation of the stages of recovery I suspect that, like the stages of grief, or any other psychological emotional spiritual process, these stages overlap and spiral and are not distinct Although I don t remember reading her saying so, perhaps she meant the emphasis shifts among the main tasks in the progression she describes The text does not stray as far from dominant narratives about the nature of those traumatized as I would personally prefer, but it provides a fabulous resource to those who wish to understand the nature of trauma and to glimpse possibilities of what healing may look like In a time when still many would claim that those who have experienced trauma are irrevocably damaged and seek to separate them off from sane society, this text stands in defiance to that view and testifies to the terrible widespread nature of trauma, the courage and determination of survivors and the commitment of therapists in seeking to provide help and hope